Family - Bantry Connection - Hutchins - Origins of Camac

one-name.org/name_profile/cammack/

Reproduced from The Guild of One-Name Studies, Camac One-Name Study, Tim Sylvester, cammack@one-name.org

In Ireland, several members of the Camac family from Lurgan, Co. Louth, went into service with the Honourable East India Company (HEICS) and made a considerable fortune in 18th century. One of these gentleman, Jacob Camac (1745-1784) commanded the 24th (Ramgarh) Infantry that subdued the districts of Ramgarh, Palamau and Chota Nagpur, over which the HEICS gave him political control. He brutally suppressed a sepoy rebellion and had an illegitimate daughter Eliza Marian Camac (1775-1804) by the Princess Marionissa of Mysore, niece of Hyder Ali and a cousin of Tippo Sahib. His maps of his campaigns in the North West of India are in the British Library. His father John Camac and brother Turner Camac (1751-1830) owned copper mines in County Wicklow, Ireland and in 1792 minted the 'Camac' pennies, halfpennies and farthings. Turner Camac was also a founder and director of the Grand Canal Company in 1791, causing him to be commemorated by the still extant 'Camac Bridge' in Dublin. Turner Camac emigrated to Philadelphia in 1804 and was a volunteer sergeant in the 1812 War. This family sought to prove a connection to the armorial Cammock family of Layer Marney, Essex. They employed a genealogist and published two books to this end. These pieces of vanity publishing however did not prove the case to the satisfaction of the College of Arms.

Thus we see that Jacob Camac (1745 – 1784), of Lurgan, Co Louth, fathered a natural daughter Eliza Marian Camac (1775 – 1804) by Princess Marionissa of Mysore.

Eliza married Arthur Robert Newburgh (1767 – 10 May 1800), of Ballybaisse, Co Cavan, on 16 Oct 1792, their second daughter Frances Camac Newburgh marrying Samuel Hutchins of Ardnagashel in 1822 as detailed in the Generation Table.

Frances' subsequent death and burial (p 35, entry XXXII) was in Dundrum, near Dublin, but I don't know the circumstances.

Her elder sister Mary Camac Newburgh married a Mr E Jenkins of Dundalk, on 7 Jan 1827 (as per The Monthly Magazine, or British Register, of Literature, Sciences and Belles-Lettres, Feb 1826, p 223)